Sen. Grisanti and UB researchers to advocate state funding for Multiple Sclerosis research

Media Advisory: State Sen. Grisanti and UB researchers advocate state funding for NYS Multiple Sclerosis Registry and Consortium

 

WATCH THE SUPPORT:

http://buffalo.ynn.com/content/647849/ms-researchers-look-to-albany-for-support/

 

BUFFALO, N.Y. — New York State Senator Mark Grisanti will join multiple sclerosis researchers at the University at Buffalo and patients to advocate for funding by New York State to maintain and expand the New York State MS Registry and the New York State MS Consortium, directed by Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, UB professor of neurology.

When: 1 p.m., March 15, 2013

Where: UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Center, 5 floor, above the Gates Vascular Institute, 875 Ellicott Street, Buffalo

Why: MS Awareness Week runs from March 11 to 17. The incidence of MS in Western New York is twice the national average. The disease costs New York State between $1.5 and $2.3 billion each year.  Support for the registry and consortium of 15 MS centers across the state will facilitate NYS research on MS, boost physician knowledge about the disease and improve the quality of life for the 30,000 New York State residents with MS.

http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2013/03/018.html

Speakers will include:

· State Sen. Mark Grisanti, a member of the MS Legislative Alliance for the New York State Senate, and whose family has been affected by MS

· Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, UB professor of neurology in the School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, and director of the NYS MS Registry

· Murali Ramanathan, PhD, UB professor of pharmaceutical sciences in the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and MS researcher

· An MS patient

Press arrangements: Ellen Goldbaum of UB University Communications at 645-4605 and 771-9255 onsite.

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One Comment on “Sen. Grisanti and UB researchers to advocate state funding for Multiple Sclerosis research”

  1. UB study casts doubt on MS treatment
    Researchers see no marked improvement

    BY: HENRY DAVIS

    A local study of the safety and efficacy of angioplasty to treat multiple sclerosis has found that the intervention, sometimes called “liberation therapy,” did not improve patient outcomes and, in a few cases, made symptoms worse.

    Buffalo researchers say the trial is the first rigorous study of angioplasty for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency, or CCSVI, a treatment that has gained worldwide attention since 2009 when an Italian researcher, Dr. Paolo Zamboni, found a relationship between MS and signs of abnormal blood drainage in veins.

    http://buffalonews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20130317/CITYANDREGION/130319279/1010

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